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Apr
2017
Wednesday 19th
posted by Lamiat Sabin in Britain

POLITICIANS of all shades have weighed in on the snap general election called by PM Theresa May yesterday.

Communist Party leader Robert Griffiths said that the unelected PM had called the election because she was standing on shaky ground and had “no mandate for five more years of austerity, privatisation and war.”

Ms May had been on the losing side of the EU referendum last June, and next month would be time to give the Tories another election shock, he said.

Labour’s shadow home secretary Diane Abbott said Ms May had decided to “cut and run” ahead of Brexit negotiations and predicted an unpleasant campaign under the management of spin-doctor Lynton Crosby, the man behind the dirty campaigning for Zac Goldsmith when he ran against Labour’s Sadiq Khan in the London mayoral election.

Mr Khan said: “I will be fighting hard for every Labour vote over the coming weeks — a Labour government is in the best interests of all Londoners and the whole country.”

Green Party co-leader Caroline Lucas welcomed an early vote at a time when “Britain is at a crossroads” and promised that the Greens would present a “bold, positive vision for a different kind of Britain.”

Her co-leader Jonathan Bartley said the announcement, following a string of denials there would be an early vote, revealed a “deep dishonesty at the heart of government.”

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron said that the June 8 poll was Britain’s chance to avoid a “disastrous hard Brexit.” His party was almost wiped out in the 2015 general election after colluding with Tories for five years in a coalition government.

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall said that Ms May’s decision was based on the “weakness” of the Labour Party. Ukip no longer has any MPs.




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