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Men's Football PFA's Gordon Taylor calls on the FA and government to eliminate violent fans

PROFESSIONAL Footballers Association chief executive Gordon Taylor called Sunday’s attack on Jack Grealish “disgraceful” and “cowardly” today and believes the authorities must work with the government to help stamp out such incidents.

Aston Villa captain Grealish was punched by a fan during his side’s derby match at Birmingham on Sunday, while later in the afternoon Manchester United defender Chris Smalling was also confronted on the pitch at Arsenal.

Those incidents came after a supporter confronted Rangers player James Tavernier during their game against Hibernian at Easter Road on Friday.

After a spate of incidents, Taylor insisted the authorities must “put a lid on the problem” quickly and he has called on the Football Association to work with the government, police and stewards at the grounds to help stamp out such behaviour.

“It was disgraceful, cowardly and criminal. We have seen an increase in such behaviour at clubs this season. It’s been racist abuse, it’s been anti-semitism and now it’s real fear for the safety of players,” Taylor said.

“From that point of view, we had a meeting just the other week with the Minister for Sport about engaging on this issue between the police and the stewards, which is crucial, and the responsibility of clubs about trying to get the right balance between educating supporters but also having sanctions to make sure we put a lid on it because we’ve been down this road before and we don’t want to go there again and see the game threatened.”

Minister for Sport Mims Davies called the incidents “a disgrace” and added: “It is right that they are investigated immediately and strong action is taken by the football authorities and clubs.

“Protecting players’ safety is of paramount importance and every possible step must be taken to ensure that they are not put at risk.”

When asked about what sanctions should be implemented, Taylor said: “That’s a job for the Football Association, but it’s also a job for the police when the culprits are caught because these are criminal acts.

“If it happened on the high street then severe action would be taken. There’s no reason why that shouldn’t be done just because it’s a football ground.

“There’s a combination of sanctions you can consider — fines, ground closures, playing games behind closed doors and points deductions. Every case needs to be looked at on its merits but it has to be a job for the national association.

“I do believe it needs football getting together with government, as it has in the past, with the police and with stewards. I just feel it does need a coming together for us to deal with it.”

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