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Men's Football SOS call for London's oldest football ground: The Old Spotted Dog

THE Old Spotted Dog has taken a further step up the endangered species list.

The situation at London’s oldest football ground is now at a critical level, with a potentially unprecedented instance of a liquidation being pushed through despite a High Court injunction in place precisely to stop that happening.

It could leave Clapton’s historic home in the sole control of the club’s chief executive Vince McBean, instead of the charity which was set up to run it. And Mr McBean would have much more freedom to do what he likes with it.

The recap of the story so far reveals why Clapton’s fans’ groups, who are already boycotting home games, feel the ground is in grave danger if this happens…

Charity Commission investigation

Mr McBean was due to attend an interview with the Charity Commission on March 2 2017.

This was his final opportunity to answer the Commission’s serious questions about his conduct and mismanagement of Newham Community Leisure Limited, the charity that leases the Old Spotted Dog from the freeholder.

Mr McBean had already postponed the meeting twice, on December 22 2016 and January 19 2017.

New company set up to replace charity

Veercourt CIC was listed at Companies House just one week after the second postponement, on January 26 2017.

Its only listed director was Mr McBean.

Voluntary liquidation attempted

A bid for voluntary liquidation of the charity NCLL was launched on March 1 2017, the day before Mr McBean’s scheduled interview with the Charity Commission, seemingly in an effort to transfer the assets to the freshly incorporated Veercourt CIC.

With no charity left for them to investigate, the Charity Commission meeting was cancelled and Mr McBean was off the hook — briefly.

High Court injunction stops liquidation

On April 10 2017, a trustee of NCLL and a life member of Clapton FC successfully halted the voluntary liquidation process and a High Court injunction was obtained.

On July 19 2017, a High Court judge directed that the Charity Commission should be involved and any liquidation could not be completed until they had their say.

A long process of waiting for their report began.

Winding up petition

Unknown to the Charity Commission, or the people that had obtained the injunction, a winding up petition was presented to the High Court on October 6 and their case was heard and approved by the Court in January 2018.

Liquidation attempt part two

This began another liquidation — this time involuntary — due to debts to an external creditor who has claimed they are owed money.

The purported creditor is Taylor Bridge Legal Services (TBLS), though there are no records available to show what the alleged debt is for or even how much it is supposed to be.

TBLS is run solely by an ex-solicitor called Antoinette Olivia Taylor who was struck off the Roll of Solicitors in November 2012 for multiple cases of dishonesty and misrepresentation.

Asset of Community Value

A welcome complication is that Clapton fans managed to establish the ground as an Asset of Community Value in May 2017.

This also covers the adjoining garage, which NCLL actually owns the freehold on, unlike the rest of the ground where it is the leaseholder only.

Six months’ notice would need to be given to give the local community the opportunity to raise the funds to purchase it before it could be sold to anyone else.

This presents a ray of hope for the future of the ground as it cannot easily be sold off but in reality the cost is likely to be out of reach.

As has been seen recently at Dulwich Hamlet, there are likely to be property companies waiting to swoop on valuable London land.

Despite the land being designated for sporting use, developers are often happy to sit on the land and even leave it unused until the council gives in and lets them build.

Boycotting fans

Relations between Clapton’s fans and Mr McBean had already deteriorated over the years.

Fan groups Friends of Clapton FC, Real Clapton and Clapton Ultras had sponsored the club’s kit, volunteered and promoted the hell out of games, helping attendances to averages of nearly 400.

However, things hit absolute rock bottom last season when fans turned up to a midweek game to find admission prices had been raised completely unannounced.

Last summer’s liquidation bid was the final straw and Real Clapton members voted to call for a boycott of home games, which was backed by all other fan groups, to avoid giving money to the person who was attempting to liquidate the charity.

Home attendances have since fallen by almost 90 per cent with the Ultras’ iconic Scaffold stand looking empty and forlorn, though away crowds have kept on growing.

Garage sale

Mr McBean is rumoured to be keen to sell the freehold on the garage to cover the alleged debt to TBLS and then continue to transfer the lease on the Old Spotted Dog ground itself into his own name, under his Veercourt CIC company.

This would allow him to continue as he was without the scrutiny of the Charity Commission, creating a new platform from which to continue operating, bypass regulations and avoid any critical scrutiny and legal action.

Where we are now

That the situation has been allowed to get to this stage seems to be unprecedented and exposes failings at several stages — the High Court issued an injunction that halted the original liquidation, the Members Voluntary Liquidation (MVL).

Months later, the same High Court allowed the next Compulsory Winding-Up Petition to proceed to Companies Court and appear to have failed to check the records at Companies House which still haven’t been updated to show a winding up petition, and at the Insolvency Service who are currently failing to act despite being made aware of the problem recently.

It is understood that the Charity Commission report into McBean’s mismanagement is now complete and awaiting publication. However, the report is yet to be published despite the severity of what could happen if the Charity Commission fails to step in.

What happens next

Statutory body after statutory body has failed to act so far.

Even so, the Insolvency Service, which is now responsible for the liquidation, and the Charity Commission, which has written but not published its report, remain the last hope to stop the destruction of a historic football ground and ensure its assets are used for community good.

The Insolvency Service must resolve the issue in conjunction with the Charity Commission, who must publish their report immediately and follow through by taking the appropriate actions that it raises.

We are told that Real Clapton will soon put out a call to arms on how you can help, with supporters holding an open meeting on the future of the Spotted Dog on April 11 at 7pm at Durning Hall, Forest Gate. 

In the meantime, you can contact them on info@claptonfc.info with any offers of support, suggestions or questions. 

Anyone with fond memories of the Old Spotted Dog’s history, or with bright hopes for its future, is encouraged to help.

This article was first published on March 26 at https://claptonfcnews.wordpress.com/2018/03/26/old-spotted-dog-on-the-en...

The Star contacted Mr McBean for comment and at the time of publishing were still awaiting a response.

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