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Theresa May should take a stand

Vona's Jobbik party has a consistent record of Holocaust denial

Home Secretary Theresa May was guest of honour at the Board of Deputies of British Jews annual dinner last November, telling those present that the coalition government would "not tolerate anti-semitism in any form."

She has the opportunity to make good on that pledge today by slapping a ban on Hungarian fascist leader Gabor Vona's planned visit to Britain this weekend.

Vona's Jobbik (Movement for a Better Hungary) party has a consistent record of Holocaust denial and hatred towards Jews and Roma who were the principal targets of nazi genocide.

A Budapest government ban on Jobbik's Hungarian Guard movement paramilitary wing was confirmed in December by the European Court of Human Rights, ruling that its marches were intended to induce fear and lay the basis for an "essentially racist" legal order.

The ECHR also highlighted the Hungarian judgement that "the movement's activities and manifestations were based on racial conflict between Hungarian majority and Roma minority," which reflects fascist involvement in several murders of Roma.

However, despite ordering disbandment of the Hungarian Guard, the conservative government in Budapest has been half-hearted at best in its efforts to counter anti-semitism.

Hungarian Jews have threatened to boycott the official Holocaust memorial events this weekend in protest at its trivialisation by the Veritas historical institute, set up by the government in November.

Jewish umbrella body Mazsihisz demanded the removal of its director Sandor Szakaly, who recently referred to the 1941 removal of 18,000 Jewish refugees to the Kamenets-Podolsk death camp in Ukraine as "a police action against aliens."

Jobbik leaders have been able to get away with calls for a special police force to deal with "Gypsy crime" and protests against the World Jewish Congress being held in Budapest, dubbing the delegates "Israeli conquerors" who should "look for another country in the world because Hungary is not for sale."

Vona claims that his planned visit is to address Hungarians living in Britain on Sunday about national and European parliamentary elections due later this year.

If our government allows him a platform in London, he will attract a turnout not only from fascist-minded Hungarians but also from the flotsam and jetsam of Britain's far-right that has been in free-fall in recent times.

This country's own faded fuehrer Nick Griffin has already expressed his delight at forming an electoral pact for the EU poll with Jobbik
Griffin's BNP made a tactical decision some years ago to mute its anti-semitism and put its jackboots and swastikas in cold storage in the hope of making an electoral breakthrough.

As that breakthrough has degenerated into a breakdown, he seeks to enthuse dwindling numbers of the faithful by aligning the BNP with openly murderous groups.

As Griffin himself put it, "there are a common core set of values." These are visible and readily understandable.

It should be unthinkable for any mainstream politician to allow free entry to an undesirable such as Vona, especially when Holocaust Memorial Day is due to be commemorated on Monday.

If the words Never Again inscribed at Dachau concentration camp are to mean anything, there can be no question of allowing the vile racism that characterised Germany's nazi regime to be spouted freely.

The Home Secretary should order the immigration authorities to ban entry to Vona and any other Jobbik leader coming to Britain.

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